Controller Annoyance at touch n go’s/practice approaches

GMX

Trusted Contributor
Messages
204
At one point we had 10 airports with instrument approaches and the most I think I ever vectored at the same time was like 6 or 7. Some were a good 60 miles from another so it could be easy to get tunnel vision on one side of the scope and screw up a turn on or whatever on the other. Sometimes it was only a few airports at a time but with multiples to each one in a variety of VFR and IFR PAs, with a bunch of slow ass C172s and PA28s and then mix in the BE20s and various business jets, and the RJs and 737s to the primary airport and then requests for ODO or crossing runways or whatever.

For the most part I was like whatever, but there were some June through August weekends that killed me and made me hate it. I guess it wasn't even the complexity of the traffic...but you know who flies on the weekends.
 

flypilot

Member
Messages
44
We had a controller transfer from there, now certified, but was monitoring some thunderstorm buildups with a few deviations. After watching for awhile, he asked the controller working when he was going to get in-trail. The controller said he was getting in-trail and the guy from Phoenix eyes got bigger. He said if that happened there, they would get 25-30 in-trail! So it doesn’t surprise me that they get annoyed working less traffic and a few practice approaches.
Yeah P50 doesnt know what to do when clouds form. I tried to get actual IMC practice in February on a beautiful IMC day and they were running hour long releases between departures from my Class D
 

DankVectorz

Legendary Member
FAA
Messages
940
Facility
N90 New York Tracon
We had a controller transfer from there, now certified, but was monitoring some thunderstorm buildups with a few deviations. After watching for awhile, he asked the controller working when he was going to get in-trail. The controller said he was getting in-trail and the guy from Phoenix eyes got bigger. He said if that happened there, they would get 25-30 in-trail! So it doesn’t surprise me that they get annoyed working less traffic and a few practice approaches.
we had a now retired Sup who was at P50 at one point and he would talk so much shit about them lol. Always made “air quotes” when calling them “controllers”.
 

DankVectorz

Legendary Member
FAA
Messages
940
Facility
N90 New York Tracon
Was he making air quotes and talking shit while getting his currency time at 2pm on a Tuesday? Lol
nah I’ll give our sups one thing they have to get fully certified and cover staffing pretty regularly. Now he’s a CA on a E175 for one of the regionals.
 

atcrick

Member
Messages
31
Just wondering how annoyed controller are at aircraft that want to do touch n go’s or practice approaches especially if it’s multiple from the same aircraft?

Also, I been reading about aircraft who want to go do touch n go’s at big airports with traffic light due to the Coronavirus. I think there might have been a video on YouTube about someone doing it? If the big airport is not busy at all, why can’t they accommodate it? Are they just annoyed or not wanting to accomodate? I mean GA airports like Centennial in Denver do touch n go’s all the time and get less weight per op than an air carrier
Be Careful!! So I retired out of Denver Tower, Let me give you a bit of a warning so your not surprised when you get a bill in the mail.
The city and County of Denver charges landing fees as do most major airports, but you say im not landing....here is how it used to work, not sure of today's policy. a radar feed is sent to the city and aircraft that drops target over the main bang or runway complex is charged. a bill is sent to the registered owner of the aircraft, even overflights although those are easily disregarded. I have had many a GA call me on the phone after doing a few touch and gos complaining about the fees. if you want to play at a major airport be prepared to pay the price, when i was there the going rate was around $40 for a landing fee, your take offs are free.

So I retired out of Denver Tower, Let me give you a bit of a warning so your not surprised when you get a bill in the mail.
The city and County of Denver charges landing fees as do most major airports, but you say im not landing....here is how it works a radar feed is sent to the city and aircraft that drops target over the main bang or runway complex is charged. a bill is sent to the registered owner of the aircraft, even overflights although those are easily disregarded. I have had many a GA call me on the phone after doing a few touch and gos complaining about the fees. if you want to play at a major airport be prepared to pay the price, when i was there the going rate was around $150 for a landing fee, your take offs are free.
I stand corrected, I just reviewed the cost:
B. Landing Fees for General Aviation and Other Aircraft: All aircraft operators other than scheduled and nonscheduled air and cargo carriers, charter, regional commuter and air taxi operators shall pay a minimum fee on all arrivals of aircraft equal to $40.00 per landing or $4.92 per 1,000 pounds of maximum gross allowable landing weight, whichever is greater. C. Fuel Flowage Fees: All aircraft operators other than scheduled air and cargo carriers, charter, regional commuter and air taxi operators shall pay a $0.08 per gallon fuel flowage fee. This charge shall be collected and remitted by operators who dispense aviation fuel at the Airport, and shall be in addition to the landing fee. D. Landing Fees for Helicopters: The fee for all arrivals of helicopter aircraft shall be $20.00 per landing

1) No fee shall be due in the event an aircraft departs from the airport for another destination and is forced to return and land at the airport because of meteorological conditions, mechanical or operating causes or for any similar emergency or precautionary reason. 2) No landing fees shall be payable by any aircraft owned and operated by the United States government and its agencies, non-commercial aircraft owned and operated by foreign governments on a flight authorized by the Department of State, or commercial aircraft on a flight dedicated to carrying foreign heads of state and not operating as a commercial flight. 3) No landing fees shall be payable on non-revenue, test flights approved by either the Chief Executive (CEO) or the Chief Operating Officer (COO) that may be required to meet operational safety or Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certification requirements. 4) The CEO may waive landing fee payments, in his or her discretion, for medical, charity or non-profit events, on an infrequent basis.
 
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