Getting a PPL

Solja

Member
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63
For getting private pilots license, does the academy basically cover everything necessary for ground school? That way you can go straight to finding an instructor and start flying. Also, if anyone here thinks if going for a commercial license would also be worth it
 

UtahBeach

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137
Is
For getting private pilots license, does the academy basically cover everything necessary for ground school? That way you can go straight to finding an instructor and start flying. Also, if anyone here thinks if going for a commercial license would also be worth it
Is this a shit post?

No, basics does not replace ground school... just as having a pilots license doesn't mean you will know how to pass basics.

And your second question makes no sense without context... do you want to fly commercially? Then it's a requirement in addition to other licenses. If not, then no... why would you bother.
 

SharkBait

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130
im most of the way through my PPL. You can just go pay an instructor to let you fly, plenty do that. Others will ask that you atleast do a sporty's online ground school. You're the one paying, so you're the boss on what you do.

do you want to fly commercially?

um, yeah what he said.
 

AnyTrafficPleaseAdvise

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162
It does cover some of the basics of how to read VFR Sectional charts, basic aircraft systems, runway/taxiway operations, airport lighting and markings, aviation weather and forecasts, and some pilots environment information. However, there is still a lot to learn to be a pilot. You would need to learn systems more in-depth for your individual aircraft (electrical, Navigation, Fuel etc.) aerodynamic theory, CTAF operations, requirements for entering controlled and uncontrolled airspace, medical requirements, and aircraft documents Just to name a few. If you want to fly professionally get the commercial license. If you don’t, a private license and an instrument rating is all I recommend, but that’s up to you ultimately.
 

Solja

Member
Messages
63
It does cover some of the basics of how to read VFR Sectional charts, basic aircraft systems, runway/taxiway operations, airport lighting and markings, aviation weather and forecasts, and some pilots environment information. However, there is still a lot to learn to be a pilot. You would need to learn systems more in-depth for your individual aircraft (electrical, Navigation, Fuel etc.) aerodynamic theory, CTAF operations, requirements for entering controlled and uncontrolled airspace, medical requirements, and aircraft documents Just to name a few. If you want to fly professionally get the commercial license. If you don’t, a private license and an instrument rating is all I recommend, but that’s up to you ultimately.

Gotcha, thanks for the information. The reason I asked for commercial, is because I read you needed that license to fly up skydivers. Thought it’d be fun to do on the side
 

bdenny20

Member
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33
Gotcha, thanks for the information. The reason I asked for commercial, is because I read you needed that license to fly up skydivers. Thought it’d be fun to do on the side

Then you need a commercial license. It's not uncommon to go through a layer or two on your way up to 13.5, so most (legitimate) DZ's will require an instrument rating. There are other catches too. Thanks to insurance premiums, you have a fat chance in hell in getting a DZ job as a wet commercial pilot...don't let the people at /r/flying try and convince you it's in the same category as aerial surveying and banner towing. If you want to fly a 182 at a small DZ, expect to require around 500TT and around 25 hours logged in type. If you want to fly a turbine (C208, Skyvan, C90,) anticipate damn well near ATP mins. 1,000-1,500 hours TT required, multi, and time in type.

Additionally, flying divers requires a special set of skills that normal pilots do not have to deal with. Understanding winds aloft to a much higher degree, jump runs, hot fueling, and quick turns will be key to getting your first DZ job....and you're not going to have that intimate experience unless you are already a skydiver. DZO's will pick a skydiving pilot over a whuffo.

Last, but not least. Second only to your logbook experience...'clicking' with the DZO, the fun jumpers, the TI's and the manifest crew is very important. If you're a jumper there, and people get to know and trust your decision making skills...you will have an easier time finding a job than if you just rolled off the street with a resume.
 

tylertrend

Trusted Contributor
Messages
136
Another pilot here. Short answer, just do an actual ground school, whether virtual or in person it's important. Instrument rating is good and could save your life. Commercial takes years of puttering around or a dedicated effort to build the hours for. If you don't really think you'll use it much or want to drop jumpers here and here, I wouldn't advise that personally.
 
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