Security Clearance References Issue

BillyBob

Forum Sage
Messages
124
I have posted this question a couple of times but I have not received any useful responses. I understand that the CIL will be asking for 3 references (friends?) who know about my life for within the last seven years. I’m a pretty introverted dude, my high school friends moved on with their lives, and frankly I haven’t felt the need to have close friends. I have a good friend, but he’s also my boss and will probably be listed under my work info. I have my dad and mom, but they’re my dad and mom. I have some co-workers but none that I really hang out with outside of work. My worry is that I’m going to not pass the clearance because I don’t have close friends in my 30’s... I have been told: You need three references. Any advice? Will it matter?
 
Messages
27
If you are talking about the security clearance which I think you are.....just put people who know you now that can verify who you are. I used to workers as well when I did mine.
 

32andBelow

Forum Sage
Messages
360
Worst case it’ll take longer for them to verify who you are but it shouldn’t prevent you from getting a clearance. If they need more info they will ask for it. I didn’t put enough info in one section and they emailed me.
 

Papa_Mike

Member
Messages
13
Do your parents have any long term friends? All three of my references were family friends that I consider ‘aunts’ and ‘uncles’. Mainly because I don’t trust my friends...
 

ATCHopeful

Trusted Contributor
Messages
64
You'll be fine. Just put three people who can give some picture of you for the last 7-10 years. If you don't have anyone that can do all those years, split it up between the three. One person who knew you well 5-7 years ago, someone who's known you the last couple years, etc. It can be anyone that isn't directly related to you.

Believe me, BIs are good at their jobs. They can turn those three people into 30 people in just one week. They will get what they need to know from anyone you have ever interacted with at some length if it comes to that. Don't worry about this. Just put down what they ask for, and they will do the rest.
 

yup

Trusted Contributor
Messages
139
One person who knew you well 5-7 years ago, someone who's known you the last couple years, etc. It can be anyone that isn't directly related to you.
When I filled out the e-QIP for TSA last summer the site yelled at me if I said I wasn't currently in contact with my "knew me a long time ago" person (they moved away three years ago). I guess I was "in contact" with them because I asked about putting them down on the form, but just to be aware about that.

Also for this investigation do they actually do in-person interviews, track down "developed" references, etc? Or do they just send a postcard questionnaire to the three people you put down? I've seen conflicting reports.
 

ATCHopeful

Trusted Contributor
Messages
64
When I filled out the e-QIP for TSA last summer the site yelled at me if I said I wasn't currently in contact with my "knew me a long time ago" person (they moved away three years ago). I guess I was "in contact" with them because I asked about putting them down on the form, but just to be aware about that.

Also for this investigation do they actually do in-person interviews, track down "developed" references, etc? Or do they just send a postcard questionnaire to the three people you put down? I've seen conflicting reports.
Isn't this just a public trust-secret clearance? They may not get that thorough. Although I can't tell whether this is secret, public, trust, top secret or what. If it's not top secret, they likely won't get that deep into it. It's only TS and TS/SCI where they will investigate everything about you possible, including interviewing dozens of people, many of whom you never put on the form. A polygraph may even be done.

This doesn't seem to be on that same level, so they may just send the questionnaire.
 

zachsss

Trusted Contributor
Messages
40
Isn't this just a public trust-secret clearance? They may not get that thorough. Although I can't tell whether this is secret, public, trust, top secret or what. If it's not top secret, they likely won't get that deep into it. It's only TS and TS/SCI where they will investigate everything about you possible, including interviewing dozens of people, many of whom you never put on the form. A polygraph may even be done.

This doesn't seem to be on that same level, so they may just send the questionnaire.
I'm pretty sure it's just a secret clearance. I had to do the same thing when I joined the navy, and I don't think they actually called anyone I put down.
But if they do, it's pretty much just to verify you are who you say you are.
 

GulfBravoPapa

Forum Sage
Messages
654
They will definitely contact your employers and send out questionnaires to your references. Gaps in employment or living history will likely result in an in person interview, as will many other things. If you have any legal issues, arrests, debts you had better start collecting all the paperwork now.
 

yup

Trusted Contributor
Messages
139
There is no clearance. It’s a public trust background check.
Then why do you need a "conditional clearance" (or completed investigation) before you can go to the academy? Is it just mis-wording or what?

edit: Going by the 1600-1E document someone posted last week, non-FSS ATCS positions are deemed "moderate risk" and get an NACI (or higher). From my research, this would correspond to a Tier 1 or Tier 2 background investigation (under the new OPM classification), but those use the SF-85 and SF-85P respectively; the SF-86 is only used for Tiers 3 and 5... so I really have no idea and I guess I'll just have to wait and see.
 
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MJ

Administrator
Staff member
Messages
2,107
Its just the term used. The "conditional" part is actually a waiver if preliminary checks have no red flags, allowing someone to start before the entire process is complete. You don't ever get an actual security clearance (S, TS). Risk and Sensitivity are the criteria for clearance/BI requirement. ATC is moderate/non-sensitive. The SF86 is whats used, and the BI is T2. NACI is a background check standard, not a clearance level. It's the lowest (T1). One step above is the moderate background investigation (T2). Once fully "cleared", the only thing on record is a positive T2 adjudication from the FAA. The agency is one who decides to give a positive/negative adjudication.

This site has a ton of info about security clearance stuff: Position Designation and the Type of Investigation Required - ClearanceJobs
Here's a summary matrix: A Guide to Position Designation and Investigation Type Since I'm sure itll be asked, the FAA uses SF86 instead of the SF85P. Don't know the reason, could simply be agency preference.
Edit: after researching a little more, the SF86 has questions relevant to moderate risk positions (which ATC is) which aren't on the current version of the SF85P
 
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yup

Trusted Contributor
Messages
139
Oh wow! That answers just about every question I had, thanks.
 
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