4-7-4. RADIO FREQUENCY AND RADAR BEACON CHANGES FOR MILITARY AIRCRAFT

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  • 4-7-4. RADIO FREQUENCY AND RADAR BEACON CHANGES FOR MILITARY AIRCRAFT

    When military single-piloted turbojet aircraft will conduct an approach wholly or partly in IFR conditions or at night, take the following action:

    NOTE: It is known that the mental distraction and the inadvertent movement of aircraft controls resulting from the pilot’s turning, reaching, or leaning to change frequencies can induce spatial disorientation (vertigo).

    1. Avoid radio frequency and radar beacon changes to the maximum extent that communications capabilities and traffic will permit. However, when changes are required:
      1. Give instructions early enough to allow the change before the aircraft reaches the approach fix or handoff point.
      2. Keep frequency/radar beacon changes to a minimum below 2,500 feet above the surface.
      3. Avoid requiring frequency/radar beacon changes during the time the aircraft is making a turn.
    2. When traffic volume requires, a frequency other than the one used by aircraft making approaches may be assigned for use in transferring control to the approach control facility.

      TERMINAL

    3. If practicable, use a frequency common to both the GCA unit and approach control to minimize frequency changes.
    4. When a GCA unit is not able to communicate on a common frequency, a change to a GCA frequency may be authorized.
    5. When a nonradar approach will be made, aircraft may be instructed to change to tower frequency when:
      1. The reported ceiling is at or above 1,500 feet and visibility is 5 statute miles or more.
      2. The aircraft reports able to proceed by visual reference to the surface.
      3. The aircraft requests and is cleared for a contact approach.
      4. The aircraft is cleared for a visual approach. f. Avoid making frequency/radar beacon changes after an aircraft begins a high altitude approach.
    6. In the event of a missed approach, do not require a frequency/radar beacon change before the aircraft reaches the missed approach altitude, the MEA, or the MVA.
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