Kim's Place OKC

My Enroute Experience - 2018

Academy Study Guides

bceltics933

Active Member
Messages
67
So I've done about all the apartment shopping and fortnite playing I can handle for this week. Since I don't start at my facility for a few more days I figured I could spend a little bit of time being semi-productive. I applied for the 2017 bid and finished up at the Academy last week. This is how it went for me, that doesn't mean this is how its gonna go for you. But if any of you are like me and like to get as much info as possible before doing something I thought this might be helpful.

Pre-Academy Stuff

So before we get to the academy we all get a TOL and FOL and medical and security and blah blah blah. I'm gonna assume you guys know how all that works so we'll skip ahead to the phone call. I just got out of class at school (trying to fill my time with something that may be useful) and got a call from some random number. Turns out it was my HR rep giving me a class date. Immediately the stress begins. Finding a place to live, getting down there, getting mentally prepared, etc.

Housing

I have two dogs that I had to take along with me so my choices were limited. Out of the three major places (Kim's, Anatole, IB) two take pets. I called Anatole first because they are a lot closer to the academy, but I would have had to stay in a hotel for a week so I ended up at IB. Take this for what you will, but all of us at IB passed. 6/6 (well there were 7 but one dropped out halfway through non-radar). Personally I loved IB. The rooms weren't as nice as Anatole, but they have free food, a shuttle, study rooms, and 5 other classmates staying there was a huge help. 2 of the people at Anatole did have to move rooms for different reasons (one got flooded in a tornado-like storm, one had termites) but after that everyone was happy with their rooms. My room was great and I would definitely stay there again if i had to.

First Day/Basics

So before your first day you can go to the academy to get your badge. Which is good because it can be tricky getting there, i know my GPS didn't seem to like to work with it. I would highly recommend going the day beforehand to familiarize yourself and make sure everything is going to be smooth as possible on the first day. I drove my car, but I took the shuttle for the first couple weeks. If anything I would recommend taking it on the first day just to take some stress out of the equation. The first day kind of sucks. You have to listen to sooooo many presentations about typical work environment stuff. So while you may be excited for your new job, the excitement doesn't last long.

Basics was pretty straight forward. Everyone in our class passed. Don't stress too much about it. Half of it doesn't even matter. I used Quizlet to study for the block tests and final and that worked pretty well. Really just use basics to get to know your classmates and develop good study habits. There really isn't much more to say about basics, just don't get a DUI.

Classmates/Study Groups

Having a drama free class is important. Try to be friends with everyone. You don't want to have study groups ruined because so and so hates this other person. My class was pretty close, sure we had a few different "groups" but generally everyone liked everyone else. We would all ask and answer each others questions, hang out on the weekends, had a few BBQs, and were pretty close knit. I'm not saying you have to be best friends with these people, but you're going to be with them and only them for four months, so try and make the best of it.

Study groups were hugely stressed during the academy. They'll tell you how this one class that passed everyone had a study group every day or how you won't pass without a study group. While study groups were great during basics and non-radar, they are almost non-existent in radar. So don't worry too much if you aren't meeting with a group during the radar problems. For basics our class got together as a whole one time. After that we had smaller groups. The group at IB would usually study for the block tests the day before, and for non-radar we would run problems almost every day. In radar the only time we got together was once the weekend before evals for about 1.5 hours just going over little things.

Non-Radar

Now is when the real fun begins. You have to do a couple weeks of academic work, but then you're on to running problems. Non-radar has a steep learning curve, especially if you're OTS, but about halfway through you start feeling more confident. Problems 13-25ish are hard. Most are probably harder than the evals you get. So don't feel bad if you get crushed on 23 like most of our class did. Focus on the little things and you'll be fine. Miss airspace, give correct departure clearances, put people into hold correctly, handle TUX, etc. Our instructor insisted we focus on the "simpler" things and it worked out for us as a class. Now I had two runs in non-radar that I could have done a lot better on. Two things, first if you know you screwed up during the problem don't let it ruin your whole problem. Accept it and move on. I somehow ended up giving a departure clearance to an airplane that hadn't even requested it. Once I realized what I did, i did my best to fix the mistake and ended up getting a lot better score than I thought I did. The second non-radar problem I ran great according to the instructor...until I gave the last departure clearance that had two sep errors in it. I would have saved myself 15 points if I waited two minutes and got a delay rather than two sep errors. I'm not saying you should do that, but it would have helped me. At the end of the day though you have to realize each non-radar problem is worth about 1/3 of one radar problem. As long as you come out without bombing both runs (like 40s on each or something) you can absolutely make it back in radar.

TL;DR: Run practice problems every day, do the little things perfectly, don't let a mistake ruin your whole run.

Radar

So you just finished non-radar feeling pretty good about your scores and are excited to tackle the real stuff. Well, sit back for two more weeks of academics. But really there's nothing better than moving to the basement after three months of waiting. It's not as bad as non-radar since you can see the airplanes and you don't have to learn all the phraseology again, but you still need to work at it. Once you know the phraseology for certain things the problems go so much smoother. Instead of stumbling over what to say, its coming out of your mouth without thinking and your brain is free to work on another problem. Get the keyboard commands down as soon as possible too, not that there are that many of them, but if you can type without looking at the keyboard you are another step ahead.

Our instructors said the problems in radar are like a roller coaster. The first version of each problem is tough, but then you get to do it two more times and it's easier. And then they throw more new stuff at you, again and again. Until the 11s and 12s. The 11s and 12s are just problems for you to hone your skills. You know how to do everything at this point, just work on doing it faster, smoother, better. What our classed agreed on unanimously was that we learned more when the instructors weren't talking to us. So if you have an instructor thats especially chatty, don't be afraid to ask them to take a step back. While its helpful in the first few problems, at a certain point you know what mistakes you make before they start talking about it. My advice for the practice problems would be to do as much as you can. If you missed a point out, go and do it late anyway. If there is a red alert that you think might be able to be solved in your airspace, wait and solve it in your airspace. Sure you might get some flashing planes, but at least you learned something. Controller judgement can be big in the evals so don't count on getting everyone else to fix your problems for you. If it takes you four times to say something correctly say it four times. You get basically two hours a day of practice. Use as much of that two hours as you can. And use the rest of the time in that building to ask questions. Most of the time asking one question starts a conversation that will help a ton.

Radar Evals

Well these are basically the two most important days of your life. No pressure. Hopefully you get the lucky straw and get to run twice on the first day. And hopefully you don't have your evals split over the weekend. Go in there and do what you know how to do. The evals aren't extraordinarily difficult, and there is a fresh batch of evals right now that seems to be spitting out a pretty good pass rate. They're busy, but they won't ask you to do things you haven't seen. Scan the radar. Scan the radar. Scan the radar.

Oh, and have fun waiting in the hallway before and after each run. If I was to ever have a heart attack it would have been right there.


12/15 in our class left OKC with a new job. Don't let the 50% pass rate scare you.

Academics

You really should be getting in the 90s on the CKTs, 100 on the AC characteristics test, and 100 on the Computer entry.

CKTs - study every bullet point in the book. Know it. I think its like 100 questions so even if you get a couple wrong you can still get a great score

AC characteristics - easy 100. Memorize a list of about 50 aircraft

Computer Entry - a little tricky since they'll ask you to do things you don't ever do, but practice in the lab/classroom and you'll be fine

Free Time

Unless you're Gods gift to controlling, i really wouldn't recommend partying every weekend. I would take Friday night (or morning if we had night classes) off, and some of Saturday off. And I usually went out every other weekend or so. Other than that I was in my apartment going over phraseology, drawing different radar scenarios, and reading the SOP. Besides there really isn't that much to do in OKC anyway.



That's all i got, let me know if you have any questions.
 

Jmt476

Lurker
Messages
8
Awesome write up! I'm starting block 4 in basics as we speak. It's nice to see what to expect in the coming weeks/months
 

HenryTheAce

Trusted Contributor
Messages
331
That’s weak! There’s not really many situations in the current evals and grading structure where it’s really good to take a delay. IMO.

This industry is full of weak controllers though... not saying that anyone on here is particularly, but they’re out there, man are they out there. Asking for sectors to split when they get more then 3 airplanes, constantly asking for d-sides, dodging traffic to go check their Cedar reads for 40minutes. They’re out there people.
 

FutureATC

Member
Messages
26
So I've done about all the apartment shopping and fortnite playing I can handle for this week. Since I don't start at my facility for a few more days I figured I could spend a little bit of time being semi-productive. I applied for the 2017 bid and finished up at the Academy last week. This is how it went for me, that doesn't mean this is how its gonna go for you. But if any of you are like me and like to get as much info as possible before doing something I thought this might be helpful.

Pre-Academy Stuff

So before we get to the academy we all get a TOL and FOL and medical and security and blah blah blah. I'm gonna assume you guys know how all that works so we'll skip ahead to the phone call. I just got out of class at school (trying to fill my time with something that may be useful) and got a call from some random number. Turns out it was my HR rep giving me a class date. Immediately the stress begins. Finding a place to live, getting down there, getting mentally prepared, etc.

Housing

I have two dogs that I had to take along with me so my choices were limited. Out of the three major places (Kim's, Anatole, IB) two take pets. I called Anatole first because they are a lot closer to the academy, but I would have had to stay in a hotel for a week so I ended up at IB. Take this for what you will, but all of us at IB passed. 6/6 (well there were 7 but one dropped out halfway through non-radar). Personally I loved IB. The rooms weren't as nice as Anatole, but they have free food, a shuttle, study rooms, and 5 other classmates staying there was a huge help. 2 of the people at Anatole did have to move rooms for different reasons (one got flooded in a tornado-like storm, one had termites) but after that everyone was happy with their rooms. My room was great and I would definitely stay there again if i had to.

First Day/Basics

So before your first day you can go to the academy to get your badge. Which is good because it can be tricky getting there, i know my GPS didn't seem to like to work with it. I would highly recommend going the day beforehand to familiarize yourself and make sure everything is going to be smooth as possible on the first day. I drove my car, but I took the shuttle for the first couple weeks. If anything I would recommend taking it on the first day just to take some stress out of the equation. The first day kind of sucks. You have to listen to sooooo many presentations about typical work environment stuff. So while you may be excited for your new job, the excitement doesn't last long.

Basics was pretty straight forward. Everyone in our class passed. Don't stress too much about it. Half of it doesn't even matter. I used Quizlet to study for the block tests and final and that worked pretty well. Really just use basics to get to know your classmates and develop good study habits. There really isn't much more to say about basics, just don't get a DUI.

Classmates/Study Groups

Having a drama free class is important. Try to be friends with everyone. You don't want to have study groups ruined because so and so hates this other person. My class was pretty close, sure we had a few different "groups" but generally everyone liked everyone else. We would all ask and answer each others questions, hang out on the weekends, had a few BBQs, and were pretty close knit. I'm not saying you have to be best friends with these people, but you're going to be with them and only them for four months, so try and make the best of it.

Study groups were hugely stressed during the academy. They'll tell you how this one class that passed everyone had a study group every day or how you won't pass without a study group. While study groups were great during basics and non-radar, they are almost non-existent in radar. So don't worry too much if you aren't meeting with a group during the radar problems. For basics our class got together as a whole one time. After that we had smaller groups. The group at IB would usually study for the block tests the day before, and for non-radar we would run problems almost every day. In radar the only time we got together was once the weekend before evals for about 1.5 hours just going over little things.

Non-Radar

Now is when the real fun begins. You have to do a couple weeks of academic work, but then you're on to running problems. Non-radar has a steep learning curve, especially if you're OTS, but about halfway through you start feeling more confident. Problems 13-25ish are hard. Most are probably harder than the evals you get. So don't feel bad if you get crushed on 23 like most of our class did. Focus on the little things and you'll be fine. Miss airspace, give correct departure clearances, put people into hold correctly, handle TUX, etc. Our instructor insisted we focus on the "simpler" things and it worked out for us as a class. Now I had two runs in non-radar that I could have done a lot better on. Two things, first if you know you screwed up during the problem don't let it ruin your whole problem. Accept it and move on. I somehow ended up giving a departure clearance to an airplane that hadn't even requested it. Once I realized what I did, i did my best to fix the mistake and ended up getting a lot better score than I thought I did. The second non-radar problem I ran great according to the instructor...until I gave the last departure clearance that had two sep errors in it. I would have saved myself 15 points if I waited two minutes and got a delay rather than two sep errors. I'm not saying you should do that, but it would have helped me. At the end of the day though you have to realize each non-radar problem is worth about 1/3 of one radar problem. As long as you come out without bombing both runs (like 40s on each or something) you can absolutely make it back in radar.

TL;DR: Run practice problems every day, do the little things perfectly, don't let a mistake ruin your whole run.

Radar

So you just finished non-radar feeling pretty good about your scores and are excited to tackle the real stuff. Well, sit back for two more weeks of academics. But really there's nothing better than moving to the basement after three months of waiting. It's not as bad as non-radar since you can see the airplanes and you don't have to learn all the phraseology again, but you still need to work at it. Once you know the phraseology for certain things the problems go so much smoother. Instead of stumbling over what to say, its coming out of your mouth without thinking and your brain is free to work on another problem. Get the keyboard commands down as soon as possible too, not that there are that many of them, but if you can type without looking at the keyboard you are another step ahead.

Our instructors said the problems in radar are like a roller coaster. The first version of each problem is tough, but then you get to do it two more times and it's easier. And then they throw more new stuff at you, again and again. Until the 11s and 12s. The 11s and 12s are just problems for you to hone your skills. You know how to do everything at this point, just work on doing it faster, smoother, better. What our classed agreed on unanimously was that we learned more when the instructors weren't talking to us. So if you have an instructor thats especially chatty, don't be afraid to ask them to take a step back. While its helpful in the first few problems, at a certain point you know what mistakes you make before they start talking about it. My advice for the practice problems would be to do as much as you can. If you missed a point out, go and do it late anyway. If there is a red alert that you think might be able to be solved in your airspace, wait and solve it in your airspace. Sure you might get some flashing planes, but at least you learned something. Controller judgement can be big in the evals so don't count on getting everyone else to fix your problems for you. If it takes you four times to say something correctly say it four times. You get basically two hours a day of practice. Use as much of that two hours as you can. And use the rest of the time in that building to ask questions. Most of the time asking one question starts a conversation that will help a ton.

Radar Evals

Well these are basically the two most important days of your life. No pressure. Hopefully you get the lucky straw and get to run twice on the first day. And hopefully you don't have your evals split over the weekend. Go in there and do what you know how to do. The evals aren't extraordinarily difficult, and there is a fresh batch of evals right now that seems to be spitting out a pretty good pass rate. They're busy, but they won't ask you to do things you haven't seen. Scan the radar. Scan the radar. Scan the radar.

Oh, and have fun waiting in the hallway before and after each run. If I was to ever have a heart attack it would have been right there.


12/15 in our class left OKC with a new job. Don't let the 50% pass rate scare you.

Academics

You really should be getting in the 90s on the CKTs, 100 on the AC characteristics test, and 100 on the Computer entry.

CKTs - study every bullet point in the book. Know it. I think its like 100 questions so even if you get a couple wrong you can still get a great score

AC characteristics - easy 100. Memorize a list of about 50 aircraft

Computer Entry - a little tricky since they'll ask you to do things you don't ever do, but practice in the lab/classroom and you'll be fine

Free Time

Unless you're Gods gift to controlling, i really wouldn't recommend partying every weekend. I would take Friday night (or morning if we had night classes) off, and some of Saturday off. And I usually went out every other weekend or so. Other than that I was in my apartment going over phraseology, drawing different radar scenarios, and reading the SOP. Besides there really isn't that much to do in OKC anyway.



That's all i got, let me know if you have any questions.
So I went ahead and read the entire post to find this was really helpful. Also, very relieving to know that essentially as long as I focus on the task at hand I should be fine.

I have a month before I report for my first Basics day. I'm OTS and was wondering if there was anything I can do in the mean time while I wait. I went ahead and purchased the AT basics study guide through pointSixtyFive which I have begun to look at. Is there anything else I should or can do to better prepare myself?
 

twn

Trusted Contributor
Messages
221
So I went ahead and read the entire post to find this was really helpful. Also, very relieving to know that essentially as long as I focus on the task at hand I should be fine.

I have a month before I report for my first Basics day. I'm OTS and was wondering if there was anything I can do in the mean time while I wait. I went ahead and purchased the AT basics study guide through pointSixtyFive which I have begun to look at. Is there anything else I should or can do to better prepare myself?
Relax and enjoy your time at home. They will teach you everything you need to know when you get there.
 

dms22590

Member
Messages
59
So I've done about all the apartment shopping and fortnite playing I can handle for this week. Since I don't start at my facility for a few more days I figured I could spend a little bit of time being semi-productive. I applied for the 2017 bid and finished up at the Academy last week. This is how it went for me, that doesn't mean this is how its gonna go for you. But if any of you are like me and like to get as much info as possible before doing something I thought this might be helpful.

Pre-Academy Stuff

So before we get to the academy we all get a TOL and FOL and medical and security and blah blah blah. I'm gonna assume you guys know how all that works so we'll skip ahead to the phone call. I just got out of class at school (trying to fill my time with something that may be useful) and got a call from some random number. Turns out it was my HR rep giving me a class date. Immediately the stress begins. Finding a place to live, getting down there, getting mentally prepared, etc.

Housing

I have two dogs that I had to take along with me so my choices were limited. Out of the three major places (Kim's, Anatole, IB) two take pets. I called Anatole first because they are a lot closer to the academy, but I would have had to stay in a hotel for a week so I ended up at IB. Take this for what you will, but all of us at IB passed. 6/6 (well there were 7 but one dropped out halfway through non-radar). Personally I loved IB. The rooms weren't as nice as Anatole, but they have free food, a shuttle, study rooms, and 5 other classmates staying there was a huge help. 2 of the people at Anatole did have to move rooms for different reasons (one got flooded in a tornado-like storm, one had termites) but after that everyone was happy with their rooms. My room was great and I would definitely stay there again if i had to.

First Day/Basics

So before your first day you can go to the academy to get your badge. Which is good because it can be tricky getting there, i know my GPS didn't seem to like to work with it. I would highly recommend going the day beforehand to familiarize yourself and make sure everything is going to be smooth as possible on the first day. I drove my car, but I took the shuttle for the first couple weeks. If anything I would recommend taking it on the first day just to take some stress out of the equation. The first day kind of sucks. You have to listen to sooooo many presentations about typical work environment stuff. So while you may be excited for your new job, the excitement doesn't last long.

Basics was pretty straight forward. Everyone in our class passed. Don't stress too much about it. Half of it doesn't even matter. I used Quizlet to study for the block tests and final and that worked pretty well. Really just use basics to get to know your classmates and develop good study habits. There really isn't much more to say about basics, just don't get a DUI.

Classmates/Study Groups

Having a drama free class is important. Try to be friends with everyone. You don't want to have study groups ruined because so and so hates this other person. My class was pretty close, sure we had a few different "groups" but generally everyone liked everyone else. We would all ask and answer each others questions, hang out on the weekends, had a few BBQs, and were pretty close knit. I'm not saying you have to be best friends with these people, but you're going to be with them and only them for four months, so try and make the best of it.

Study groups were hugely stressed during the academy. They'll tell you how this one class that passed everyone had a study group every day or how you won't pass without a study group. While study groups were great during basics and non-radar, they are almost non-existent in radar. So don't worry too much if you aren't meeting with a group during the radar problems. For basics our class got together as a whole one time. After that we had smaller groups. The group at IB would usually study for the block tests the day before, and for non-radar we would run problems almost every day. In radar the only time we got together was once the weekend before evals for about 1.5 hours just going over little things.

Non-Radar

Now is when the real fun begins. You have to do a couple weeks of academic work, but then you're on to running problems. Non-radar has a steep learning curve, especially if you're OTS, but about halfway through you start feeling more confident. Problems 13-25ish are hard. Most are probably harder than the evals you get. So don't feel bad if you get crushed on 23 like most of our class did. Focus on the little things and you'll be fine. Miss airspace, give correct departure clearances, put people into hold correctly, handle TUX, etc. Our instructor insisted we focus on the "simpler" things and it worked out for us as a class. Now I had two runs in non-radar that I could have done a lot better on. Two things, first if you know you screwed up during the problem don't let it ruin your whole problem. Accept it and move on. I somehow ended up giving a departure clearance to an airplane that hadn't even requested it. Once I realized what I did, i did my best to fix the mistake and ended up getting a lot better score than I thought I did. The second non-radar problem I ran great according to the instructor...until I gave the last departure clearance that had two sep errors in it. I would have saved myself 15 points if I waited two minutes and got a delay rather than two sep errors. I'm not saying you should do that, but it would have helped me. At the end of the day though you have to realize each non-radar problem is worth about 1/3 of one radar problem. As long as you come out without bombing both runs (like 40s on each or something) you can absolutely make it back in radar.

TL;DR: Run practice problems every day, do the little things perfectly, don't let a mistake ruin your whole run.

Radar

So you just finished non-radar feeling pretty good about your scores and are excited to tackle the real stuff. Well, sit back for two more weeks of academics. But really there's nothing better than moving to the basement after three months of waiting. It's not as bad as non-radar since you can see the airplanes and you don't have to learn all the phraseology again, but you still need to work at it. Once you know the phraseology for certain things the problems go so much smoother. Instead of stumbling over what to say, its coming out of your mouth without thinking and your brain is free to work on another problem. Get the keyboard commands down as soon as possible too, not that there are that many of them, but if you can type without looking at the keyboard you are another step ahead.

Our instructors said the problems in radar are like a roller coaster. The first version of each problem is tough, but then you get to do it two more times and it's easier. And then they throw more new stuff at you, again and again. Until the 11s and 12s. The 11s and 12s are just problems for you to hone your skills. You know how to do everything at this point, just work on doing it faster, smoother, better. What our classed agreed on unanimously was that we learned more when the instructors weren't talking to us. So if you have an instructor thats especially chatty, don't be afraid to ask them to take a step back. While its helpful in the first few problems, at a certain point you know what mistakes you make before they start talking about it. My advice for the practice problems would be to do as much as you can. If you missed a point out, go and do it late anyway. If there is a red alert that you think might be able to be solved in your airspace, wait and solve it in your airspace. Sure you might get some flashing planes, but at least you learned something. Controller judgement can be big in the evals so don't count on getting everyone else to fix your problems for you. If it takes you four times to say something correctly say it four times. You get basically two hours a day of practice. Use as much of that two hours as you can. And use the rest of the time in that building to ask questions. Most of the time asking one question starts a conversation that will help a ton.

Radar Evals

Well these are basically the two most important days of your life. No pressure. Hopefully you get the lucky straw and get to run twice on the first day. And hopefully you don't have your evals split over the weekend. Go in there and do what you know how to do. The evals aren't extraordinarily difficult, and there is a fresh batch of evals right now that seems to be spitting out a pretty good pass rate. They're busy, but they won't ask you to do things you haven't seen. Scan the radar. Scan the radar. Scan the radar.

Oh, and have fun waiting in the hallway before and after each run. If I was to ever have a heart attack it would have been right there.


12/15 in our class left OKC with a new job. Don't let the 50% pass rate scare you.

Academics

You really should be getting in the 90s on the CKTs, 100 on the AC characteristics test, and 100 on the Computer entry.

CKTs - study every bullet point in the book. Know it. I think its like 100 questions so even if you get a couple wrong you can still get a great score

AC characteristics - easy 100. Memorize a list of about 50 aircraft

Computer Entry - a little tricky since they'll ask you to do things you don't ever do, but practice in the lab/classroom and you'll be fine

Free Time

Unless you're Gods gift to controlling, i really wouldn't recommend partying every weekend. I would take Friday night (or morning if we had night classes) off, and some of Saturday off. And I usually went out every other weekend or so. Other than that I was in my apartment going over phraseology, drawing different radar scenarios, and reading the SOP. Besides there really isn't that much to do in OKC anyway.



That's all i got, let me know if you have any questions.

I just finished at the academy 2 weeks ago, and I wanted to thank you for this write up. It was very helpful to hear your experience and have the reassurance that I was where I needed to be in my training. I’m headed to ZTL now, and again I appreciate the write up!
 

Carole_Fn_Baskin

Trusted Contributor
FAA
Messages
400
Facility
ZDV Denver Center
At the academy your biggest goal before radar evals is to get as many points as possible. Sounds obvious but if you go in with 30 or more points I would say you have an 80% chance of passing. High 29 is good also. Know your map and point out/clearance phraseology. Radar is VERY deceiving when you’re doing runs. You can make 3-4 mistakes in the beginning and finish perfect during practice runs thinking you had a good run when in actuality you failed miserably. The notes the instructors write are important. Go through all your errors and find where you are losing points no matter how small. The longer you look at the radar the better chance you have to pass. The EDST sucks you in because there’s so much information and your fresh off non radar but all the answers are on the radar. Make notes on what you messed up and go over them every run until you stop making the error. The instructors that are hard on you are the good ones don’t take it personal learn from them more than anyone. I had full pages of notes on errors I made that needed to be corrected and I finished with an 89. Study groups are still effective in radar. Talk about scenarios and what your procedures are. When eval day comes don’t listen to anyone about scenarios and don’t get caught up in watching people get walked out you will know what you need to do already. On a side note if you don’t already know those military/younger R sides are there during your eval make sure you work well with them.
 

yoboiconnor

Member
Messages
123
I just finished at the academy 2 weeks ago, and I wanted to thank you for this write up. It was very helpful to hear your experience and have the reassurance that I was where I needed to be in my training. I’m headed to ZTL now, and again I appreciate the write up!
Congrats man, I saw that in the other thread that one was heading to ZTL. Didn’t look like a lot of people passed in your class though unfortunately
 

Tmaxx219

Member
Messages
33
I just finished at the academy 2 weeks ago, and I wanted to thank you for this write up. It was very helpful to hear your experience and have the reassurance that I was where I needed to be in my training. I’m headed to ZTL now, and again I appreciate the write up!
congrats man!
 
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