En route, need help with strip marking and recording clearances!

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8
Can anyone offer me some help with stripmarking, and recording clearances and control information. After an 8 hour lesson yesterday in class I still don't quite understand it. The phraseology and what goes where is just not sticking.
 

boots

Forum Sage
Messages
447
Can anyone offer me some help with stripmarking, and recording clearances and control information. After an 8 hour lesson yesterday in class I still don't quite understand it. The phraseology and what goes where is just not sticking.
Did you try asking your classmates?
 

NN9419

Forum Sage
Messages
383
Did you try asking your classmates?
+1 on this. Your best resource at the academy is going to be your fellow classmates, and students in classes a few weeks ahead of yours. No one on an Internet forum is going to be able to give you much of a tutorial.
 

Ceedubya

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FAA
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272
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ZHU Houston Center
Think of it as a conversation, you’re going from somewhere, to somewhere, how are you getting there? Etc. cleared from, to, via, climb, etc.
 

HenryTheAce

Trusted Contributor
Messages
264
Practice with classmates. Everyday after class we’d make up strips, read them, pass the inbound to tower, all that stuff. Study them like flash cards, practice that phraseology over and over and over again. Be able to RTFS without thinking, along with the mapped out phraseology they give you. It will help I promise. The more you can think about separation and not how to read a strip or talk, the better you’ll be.
 

MJ

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Staff member
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2,373
Let's just assume you're her classmate now. People get entire educations online, I don't see why this question can't be answered... There's hundreds of people here who've gone through the exact material she's asking about. Anyhow...

Jessicareinhardt22 the question is a bit generalized since there's several different types of clearances and the associated strips. A lot of this is straight memorization. You don't need to really understand much if anything to get this part done. Without specific questions its hard to provide a specific answer, but here's some general things to do:
  1. Learn the blocks of the strip. Don't worry about what goes where at first, just memorize the strip layout and be able to fill in the block numbers.
  2. Memorize the different abbreviations: A - clrd to destination, F - clrd to fix... etc. Just the abbreviation and meaning to start with. There's not that many, and they generally sort of make sense (F - clrd to fix, RR - report reaching, RL - report leaving, yadayada). The symbols can be a little more difficult at first but they fall into the same patterns. Break them into groups if it helps you to learn in smaller block: Altitude symbols, route symbols, etc.
  3. Once you know those well, you can start grouping them into the strips. First block has spaces 1-10, always contains aircraft and system data. altitude is always block 20, etc. Then you can start separating out what's different for the different types of clearances and it will be obvious what things you need or don't need. For example, it wouldn't make sense to have departure information for an arrival.
For reading/issuing clearances, you NEED to understand what you're looking at first. It's like learning the alphabet. Clearances are always structured the exact same way: you just drop items you don't need to fit the type of clearance you're giving. Learn the items which compose a clearance (in order) and be able to spit them out. I think the phraseology will follow quickly once you know what you want to say.

If you have specific questions, examples or whatever just ask.
 

kshaky

Trusted Contributor
Messages
113
Can anyone offer me some help with stripmarking, and recording clearances and control information. After an 8 hour lesson yesterday in class I still don't quite understand it. The phraseology and what goes where is just not sticking.
I am currently going into my 3rd week of nonradar at the academy. I am off the street in a class of 12 where 9 are CTIs. Nonradar has a very steep learning curve and the 1st and 2nd weeks suck. It is just starting to come together for me but I still have lots to get better at before we start running problems. Focus on the details as you start to get the big picture. Study the phraseology, know the strip marking symbols, constantly practice the map. Start with just issuing comm changes. Practice passing inbounds. The course throws everything at you at once and things move quickly but don't be discouraged and focus on the pieces rather than the big picture. Before you know it you'll be okay at the pieces and have an idea of the big picture, likely before you start running problems. Then once lab problems start it is the time to perfect the pieces and the big picture.
 
Messages
8
I am currently going into my 3rd week of nonradar at the academy. I am off the street in a class of 12 where 9 are CTIs. Nonradar has a very steep learning curve and the 1st and 2nd weeks suck. It is just starting to come together for me but I still have lots to get better at before we start running problems. Focus on the details as you start to get the big picture. Study the phraseology, know the strip marking symbols, constantly practice the map. Start with just issuing comm changes. Practice passing inbounds. The course throws everything at you at once and things move quickly but don't be discouraged and focus on the pieces rather than the big picture. Before you know it you'll be okay at the pieces and have an idea of the big picture, likely before you start running problems. Then once lab problems start it is the time to perfect the pieces and the big picture.
Thanks for the tips! Its good to hear from someone going through the same thing as me right now! All last week was like information overload for me!!!!
 
Messages
8
I am currently going into my 3rd week of nonradar at the academy. I am off the street in a class of 12 where 9 are CTIs. Nonradar has a very steep learning curve and the 1st and 2nd weeks suck. It is just starting to come together for me but I still have lots to get better at before we start running problems. Focus on the details as you start to get the big picture. Study the phraseology, know the strip marking symbols, constantly practice the map. Start with just issuing comm changes. Practice passing inbounds. The course throws everything at you at once and things move quickly but don't be discouraged and focus on the pieces rather than the big picture. Before you know it you'll be okay at the pieces and have an idea of the big picture, likely before you start running problems. Then once lab problems start it is the time to perfect the pieces and the big picture.
Are you on days? Maybe we can meet up sometime while were there to discuss some of this stuff, if you have time of course!
 

tunwno

Trusted Contributor
FAA
Messages
447
Facility
Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center
I am currently going into my 3rd week of nonradar at the academy. I am off the street in a class of 12 where 9 are CTIs. Nonradar has a very steep learning curve and the 1st and 2nd weeks suck. It is just starting to come together for me but I still have lots to get better at before we start running problems. Focus on the details as you start to get the big picture. Study the phraseology, know the strip marking symbols, constantly practice the map. Start with just issuing comm changes. Practice passing inbounds. The course throws everything at you at once and things move quickly but don't be discouraged and focus on the pieces rather than the big picture. Before you know it you'll be okay at the pieces and have an idea of the big picture, likely before you start running problems. Then once lab problems start it is the time to perfect the pieces and the big picture.
When your NR evals?
 

FoggyWindow

Member
FAA
Messages
76
Facility
ZHU Houston Center
I bombed both NR evals. 65 on one and 68 on the other. I had PerryAnn, or however TF you spell it for both of mine. I still graduated and have established myself as the best controller in the known world. Do your best but don't let it intimidate you. Everybody is overwhelmed at first.
 
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