2-1-21. TRAFFIC ADVISORIES

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  • 2-1-21. TRAFFIC ADVISORIES

    Unless an aircraft is operating within Class A airspace or omission is requested by the pilot, issue traffic advisories to all aircraft (IFR or VFR) on your frequency when, in your judgment, their proximity may diminish to less than the applicable separation minima. Where no separation minima applies, such as for VFR aircraft outside of Class B/Class C airspace, or a TRSA, issue traffic advisories to those aircraft on your frequency when in your judgment their proximity warrants it. Provide this service as follows:

    1. To radar identified aircraft:
      1. Azimuth from aircraft in terms of the 12-hour clock, or
      2. When rapidly maneuvering aircraft prevent accurate issuance of traffic as in 1 above, specify the direction from an aircraft’s position in terms of the eight cardinal compass points (N, NE, E, SE, S, SW, W, and NW). This method must be terminated at the pilot’s request.
      3. Distance from aircraft in miles.
      4. Direction in which traffic is proceeding and/or relative movement of traffic.

        NOTE: Relative movement includes closing, converging, parallel same direction, opposite direction, diverging, overtaking, crossing left to right, crossing right to left.

      5. If known, type of aircraft and altitude.
        • PHRASEOLOGY
        • TRAFFIC, (number) O’CLOCK, or when appropriate,
        • (direction) (number) MILES, (direction)-BOUND and/or (relative movement),
        • and if known,
        • (type of aircraft and altitude). or
        • When appropriate,
        • (type of aircraft and relative position), (number of feet) FEET ABOVE/BELOW YOU.
        • If altitude is unknown, ALTITUDE UNKNOWN.
        • EXAMPLE
        • “Traffic, eleven o’clock, one zero miles, southbound, converging, Boeing Seven Twenty Seven, one seven thousand.”
        • “Traffic, twelve o’clock, one five miles, opposite direction, altitude unknown.”
        • “Traffic, ten o’clock, one two miles, southeast bound, one thousand feet below you.”
      6. When requested by the pilot, issue radar vectors to assist in avoiding the traffic, provided the aircraft to be vectored is within your area of jurisdiction or coordination has been effected with the sector/facility in whose area the aircraft is operating.
      7. If unable to provide vector service,inform the pilot.
      8. Inform the pilot of the following when traffic you have issued is not reported in sight:
        1. (a) The traffic is no factor.
        2. (b) The traffic is no longer depicted on radar.
          • PHRASEOLOGY
          • TRAFFIC NO FACTOR/NO LONGER OBSERVED, or
          • (number) O’CLOCK TRAFFIC NO FACTOR/NO LONGER OBSERVED,
          • or
          • (direction) TRAFFIC NO FACTOR/NO LONGER OBSERVED.
    2. To aircraft that are not radar identified:
      1. Distance and direction from fix.
      2. Direction in which traffic is proceeding.
      3. If known, type of aircraft and altitude.
      4. ETA over the fix the aircraft is approaching, if appropriate.
      • PHRASEOLOGY
      • TRAFFIC, (number) MILES/MINUTES (direction) OF (airport or fix), (direction)-BOUND,
      • and if known,
      • (type of aircraft and altitude), ESTIMATED (fix) (time),
      • or
      • TRAFFIC, NUMEROUS AIRCRAFT VICINITY (location).
      • If altitude is unknown, ALTITUDE UNKNOWN.
      • EXAMPLE
      • “Traffic, one zero miles east of Forsythe V-O-R, Southbound, M-D Eighty, descending to one six thousand.”
      • “Traffic, reported one zero miles west of Downey V-O-R, northbound, Apache, altitude unknown, estimated Joliet V-O-R one three one five.”
      • “Traffic, eight minutes west of Chicago Heights V-O-R, westbound, Mooney, eight thousand, estimated Joliet V-O-R two zero three five.”
      • “Traffic, numerous aircraft, vicinity of Delia airport.”
    3. For aircraft displaying Mode C, not radar identified, issue indicated altitude.
      • EXAMPLE
      • “Traffic, one o’clock, six miles, eastbound, altitude indicates six thousand five hundred.”
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