Trainee Medical Reporting

Kroz

Lurker
Messages
2
If a trainee (still within 1 year probation currently in online class) has a minor procedure done and is prescribed medication - what is the proper procedure to follow in regards to when and who to report to?
 

Horny4Vectors

Forum Sage
FAA
Messages
414
Facility
N90 New York Tracon
If a trainee (still within 1 year probation currently in online class) has a minor procedure done and is prescribed medication - what is the proper procedure to follow in regards to when and who to report to?
FLM or OM. They will contact the flight surgeon for you and they will let you know how long the medication DQs you for. Also let them know the procedure, some will require paperwork to get your medical back

Edit: I didn’t see you were still in online class. Call the regional flight surgeon for your facility
 

Kroz

Lurker
Messages
2
FLM or OM. They will contact the flight surgeon for you and they will let you know how long the medication DQs you for. Also let them know the procedure, some will require paperwork to get your medical back

Edit: I didn’t see you were still in online class. Call the regional flight surgeon for your facility
Thanks for the info!Do you happen to know where to find that info if not at a facility yet?
 

Horny4Vectors

Forum Sage
FAA
Messages
414
Facility
N90 New York Tracon
Is it SOP to report things to your sup instead of calling the flight surgeon directly? I didn't know that.
I honestly don’t know if it is, just the way I’ve always done it. Figured instead of getting a surprise email, I’ll tell them, and let them figure out how long I’m out. To be fair, my OM wasn’t a worthless excuse for a paycheck.
 

ShuffleTheList

Trusted Contributor
Messages
267
Is it SOP to report things to your sup instead of calling the flight surgeon directly? I didn't know that.

fuck no. You don’t have to tell them shit. Sometimes it’s just easier to tell them and make them deal with it. When I got penis enlargement surgery and oxy to go go with it, I told my Sup so that he could go call the flight surgeon and let me know how long I would be out.

I didn’t want to call them.
 

QuebecN

Active Member
Messages
56
fuck no. You don’t have to tell them shit. Sometimes it’s just easier to tell them and make them deal with it. When I got penis enlargement surgery and oxy to go go with it, I told my Sup so that he could go call the flight surgeon and let me know how long I would be out.

I didn’t want to call them.
Was this surgery successful? Asking for a friend
 

JackTBP

Member
Messages
21
FLM or OM. They will contact the flight surgeon for you and they will let you know how long the medication DQs you for. Also let them know the procedure, some will require paperwork to get your medical back
No, you're not required to disclose information to your FLM/OM/ATM about your medication or medical condition. As previously stated, you may choose to let them know (if you're comfortable) and they can forward your information to the Flight Surgeon - but you also have every right to contact the Flight Surgeon directly to report.
See page 9: https://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/media/Order/FAA_Order_3930.3C.pdf
And Article 66, Section 8.

I remember a situation years ago where it was after hours on the weekend and a controller needed to report a medication they were prescribed before reporting to their next shift. There's a POC for our region you were supposed to call after hours and they would then pass a message to the Flight Surgeon who was on call, who would then make a medical determination or call back the controller. The POC insisted that only a FLM could call them to make the report (not true!), and that the controller was required to report their condition or medication to their FLM first (not true and an unnecessary invasion of the individual's privacy). We didn't even have a FLM on duty at the time! And the controller wasn't about to discuss their medical business with anyone but the Flight Surgeon directly. As soon as our NATCA RVP heard about it from our facrep, it was quickly resolved. The controller received a phone call from the Flight Surgeon and made their report, with no third parties involved.

Bottom line: it helps to know your contract and orders. Know your rights to medical privacy and protect your rights!
 

Phillyman2633

Legendary Member
Messages
820
I honestly don’t know if it is, just the way I’ve always done it. Figured instead of getting a surprise email, I’ll tell them, and let them figure out how long I’m out. To be fair, my OM wasn’t a worthless excuse for a paycheck.
Nah fuck that, always call the flight surgeon. Then your conversation with management goes like this: "I'll be out for 3 weeks starting November 18th, I had to get some medical work done that couldnt wait. I already informed the flight surgeon." I tell management as little as possible, always. No speculation, no bullshit.

I've found in my 7 years in the FAA that when you're in a facility with 20 or 30 controllers you get an OM and ATM who like to pretend that they're hot shit and that the buck stops with them and forget that's there's hundreds of human resources employees at headquarters and that they dont actually know dick.
 

32andBelow

Legendary Member
Messages
4,006
Nah fuck that, always call the flight surgeon. Then your conversation with management goes like this: "I'll be out for 3 weeks starting November 18th, I had to get some medical work done that couldnt wait. I already informed the flight surgeon." I tell management as little as possible, always. No speculation, no bullshit.

I've found in my 7 years in the FAA that when you're in a facility with 20 or 30 controllers you get an OM and ATM who like to pretend that they're hot shit and that the buck stops with them and forget that's there's hundreds of human resources employees at headquarters and that they dont actually know dick.
It’s crazy how medical reporting is basically never taught when you are a trainee. I had no clue when or if I had to the first time
 

Phillyman2633

Legendary Member
Messages
820
It’s crazy how medical reporting is basically never taught when you are a trainee. I had no clue when or if I had to the first time
They literally dont teach you shit at the Academy except how to walk around a table holding model airplanes. I didn't learn shit about my TSP or health plans or anything actually important until I started bullshitting with coworkers after reporting.
 

chrisnatca

Member
FAA
Messages
7
Facility
CRP Corpus Christi Tower
No, you're not required to disclose information to your FLM/OM/ATM about your medication or medical condition. As previously stated, you may choose to let them know (if you're comfortable) and they can forward your information to the Flight Surgeon - but you also have every right to contact the Flight Surgeon directly to report.
See page 9: https://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/media/Order/FAA_Order_3930.3C.pdf
And Article 66, Section 8.

I remember a situation years ago where it was after hours on the weekend and a controller needed to report a medication they were prescribed before reporting to their next shift. There's a POC for our region you were supposed to call after hours and they would then pass a message to the Flight Surgeon who was on call, who would then make a medical determination or call back the controller. The POC insisted that only a FLM could call them to make the report (not true!), and that the controller was required to report their condition or medication to their FLM first (not true and an unnecessary invasion of the individual's privacy). We didn't even have a FLM on duty at the time! And the controller wasn't about to discuss their medical business with anyone but the Flight Surgeon directly. As soon as our NATCA RVP heard about it from our facrep, it was quickly resolved. The controller received a phone call from the Flight Surgeon and made their report, with no third parties involved.

Bottom line: it helps to know your contract and orders. Know your rights to medical privacy and protect your rights!
This is absolutely the correct advice. If it's something routine, and not "personal" or embarrassing in any way, then sure, call your supervisor and have them make the call. It'll give them something useful to do.

But if it's something that you'd rather other people not know about, then call the flight surgeon directly. If he DQ's you, then tell your supervisor you've been DQ'ed. If they ask why, tell them nunyadam business. The FAA (via the flight surgeon) has every right to know every intimate detail about your health. Your supervisor isn't entitled to know shit.
 

Ad1234

Trusted Contributor
Messages
269
It’s sad they don’t teach this at the academy and then again at your facility. It’s equally sad at the Zs those career natca reps can’t help that education and the small time facrep ma none of us can expect much out of. Instead we get don’t trust managment, which in many cases we shouldnt. Instead people come on here for info that ends up being well at my facility we do....blah blah blah

call the flight surgeon, every time. Don’t let managment be apart of that call. If you need the on call flight surgeon, call the ROC and ask who is on call. Take care of it yourself.
 

32andBelow

Legendary Member
Messages
4,006
I’ve found the FS really helpful too. They’ll even recommend other drugs that may work better with our medical and your condition. He found me a muscle relaxer that only had a 12 hour DQ vs the 14 day DQ I was prescribed
 
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