Kim's Place OKC

RomeoTangoRT

Active Member
Messages
116
I would also like to point out that you need to google and dig and find the hiring criteria because there are things in there that people don’t “teach” you when applying. A couple examples: when asked what your “highest qualification” is, LC garners more points as opposed to tower sup even though in the military the sup position is what’s highly coveted. The military’s definition of sup is 180 from the FAA. LC might get you 1.0 points whereas TS might get you 0.8 when being judged against your peers. Next example, and one I had to learn the hard way and one I think is arbitrary, there is a scale to airfield difficulty. I’d have to find the memo again but it’s something like 1.0 for intersecting runways, 0.8 for parallels, 0.6 for single runway, 0.4 for heliport. The reason I say this is arbitrary is because (having worked at 3/4 types of those,) a facility working the same amount of traffic on a single runway might be more difficult than a facility matching traffic count but on parallels. Also worth noting is that there isn’t an option for a facility that has BOTH parallels AND intersecting runways. Kind of a knock on those who have worked in that environment but I digress. At the end of the day, you’ll be offered a list to rank 1-X and then the powers that be will simply throw a dart at the wall to determine the next handful of years of your life, BUT... knowing how to best position yourself might be the difference between being ranked best qualified and more qualified or whatever the technical term is because you are measured (as far as making your list goes) against your peers (a collection of everyone who has been selected, ranked on experience based off number of facilities x qualifications within said facility x facility complexity). This is all pointless information as you’ve already applied but someone might see this one day before applying, therefore I’m putting it out into the universe.
 

jamisjockey

Active Member
Messages
73
That’s music to my ears. Definitely done with the mil BS.
Being able to walk out the door off a shift and not get bothered with bullshit is huge peace of mind.
I would also like to point out that you need to google and dig and find the hiring criteria because there are things in there that people don’t “teach” you when applying. A couple examples: when asked what your “highest qualification” is, LC garners more points as opposed to tower sup even though in the military the sup position is what’s highly coveted. The military’s definition of sup is 180 from the FAA. LC might get you 1.0 points whereas TS might get you 0.8 when being judged against your peers. Next example, and one I had to learn the hard way and one I think is arbitrary, there is a scale to airfield difficulty. I’d have to find the memo again but it’s something like 1.0 for intersecting runways, 0.8 for parallels, 0.6 for single runway, 0.4 for heliport. The reason I say this is arbitrary is because (having worked at 3/4 types of those,) a facility working the same amount of traffic on a single runway might be more difficult than a facility matching traffic count but on parallels. Also worth noting is that there isn’t an option for a facility that has BOTH parallels AND intersecting runways. Kind of a knock on those who have worked in that environment but I digress. At the end of the day, you’ll be offered a list to rank 1-X and then the powers that be will simply throw a dart at the wall to determine the next handful of years of your life, BUT... knowing how to best position yourself might be the difference between being ranked best qualified and more qualified or whatever the technical term is because you are measured (as far as making your list goes) against your peers (a collection of everyone who has been selected, ranked on experience based off number of facilities x qualifications within said facility x facility complexity). This is all pointless information as you’ve already applied but someone might see this one day before applying, therefore I’m putting it out into the universe.
pretty sure you just put all your pertinent information into the application and the faa hr does the point calculation. Follow the directions precisely and you get the points you need.
 

RomeoTangoRT

Active Member
Messages
116
Being able to walk out the door off a shift and not get bothered with bullshit is huge peace of mind.

pretty sure you just put all your pertinent information into the application and the faa hr does the point calculation. Follow the directions precisely and you get the points you need.
Being that I’ve been through the process three times now, I can say with a certain level of confidence that it tells you to specify your highest qualification at each facility you worked as well as having to select facility configuration (parallels, intersecting, etc) and there are different point values for tower sup, local, etc as well as parallel vs intersecting runways. BUT like I said, working at a facility that has parallels AND intersecting runways you’re forced to choose between one and the other and if you don’t know the points system, you could be doing yourself a disservice by unintentionally selecting the lesser of the two.

My first go around I selected tower sup as my highest qualification in my infinite wisdom because that was the order of progression in the military. You got qualified (in order) flight data, ground, local, sup. So obviously TS had a higher “qualification level” than LC but a TS in the military is not the same thing as a supe in the FAA therefore it garners lesser point value.
 
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