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Centerbound

Lurker
Messages
2
Nobody in our class wanted/requested ZNY. We did hear ZNY was no longer taking trainees awhile back at the academy, and we were relieved. Then it got put back on lists, with the class ahead of us, then we got worried lol
Hey Solja, any advice for those of us who aren't at academy yet?
 

Oh_Horizon

Active Member
Messages
82
I've never even been close to that part of the country and I dont even work for the FAA yet, so go easy on me... but how does the agency expect a new person coming in at AG pay to even survive if they have to live on Long Island? Just some cursory research leads me to believe the COL is one of the highest in the nation there. But it's a common one on the lists I see, so somehow they manage? I dont see how.
 

slim

Active Member
Messages
111
I've never even been close to that part of the country and I dont even work for the FAA yet, so go easy on me... but how does the agency expect a new person coming in at AG pay to even survive if they have to live on Long Island? Just some cursory research leads me to believe the COL is one of the highest in the nation there. But it's a common one on the lists I see, so somehow they manage? I dont see how.
It’s not just Long Island. In many places it is tough on AG pay. Have savings or go do DoorDash or deliver pizzas. Many people do side hustles in the beginning, especially if you have a family that relies on you.
 

AnyTrafficPleaseAdvise

Trusted Contributor
Messages
302
Hey Solja, any advice for those of us who aren't at academy yet?
Your biggest pre-academy concern should be to Save enough money to make it through ~$12/hr with no per diem while In zoom basics and having to wait a few weeks before you get per diem once in OKC. If you have that covered, take some time to relax with family and friends if you can before you leave.
 

Solja

Member
Messages
72
Hey Solja, any advice for those of us who aren't at academy yet?
I've never studied this much in my life. I knew from reading this forum and Reddit, that someone like myself, will need to study everyday. Score as high as you can on your Academic tests (Double check everything and go slow on the checklist eval....Go slow 🤬). Those tests can literally be the final factor in wether or not you pass the program.

For nonradar, make sure you know you're phraseology/map before getting to the academy. They are not exaggerating, seriously *know it*. You're going to be surprised how much of a breeze the classroom time is going to be during the non radar portion because of this. Learning to write on physical flight strips after spending months writing on an iPad is gonna feel fucking weird, but you'll adapt quickly. In hindsight, I strongly encourage folks to know the aircraft characteristics chart before coming to the academy. I waited a week out before the test to study and I felt that was cutting it too close. Remember, we were given a huge headstart with zoom training (Know: nonradar map, nonradar phraseology, aircraft characteristics chart)

For radar, our instructors kept hinting at the craziness ahead us, joking/laughing about it while we were in nonradar....As long as you *know* the nonradar map, you don't have to study the radar map. There was literally two navaids on the map, that I needed for something and I learned them on the go during a scenario. The most alarming thing that kept killing me was the radar phraseology. Those first two weeks, I'm still confident my instructors thought I was a dumbass lmao. I admittedly still require more practice, but I got a lot better by the time radar evals came. You will make some wild mistakes in radar and be baffled on why the hell you did that

The hardest struggle during training scenarios (nonradar and radar) for me was to realize it's okay to make mistakes and to stop getting so down on myself. The best reminder I got from my instructor before each run/eval was, "Go in there and do what you know how to do"
 

AnyTrafficPleaseAdvise

Trusted Contributor
Messages
302
I've never studied this much in my life. I knew from reading this forum and Reddit, that someone like myself, will need to study everyday. Score as high as you can on your Academic tests (Double check everything and go slow on the checklist eval....Go slow 🤬). Those tests can literally be the final factor in wether or not you pass the program.

For nonradar, make sure you know you're phraseology/map before getting to the academy. They are not exaggerating, seriously *know it*. You're going to be surprised how much of a breeze the classroom time is going to be during the non radar portion because of this. Learning to write on physical flight strips after spending months writing on an iPad is gonna feel fucking weird, but you'll adapt quickly. In hindsight, I strongly encourage folks to know the aircraft characteristics chart before coming to the academy. I waited a week out before the test to study and I felt that was cutting it too close. Remember, we were given a huge headstart with zoom training (Know: nonradar map, nonradar phraseology, aircraft characteristics chart)

For radar, our instructors kept hinting at the craziness ahead us, joking/laughing about it while we were in nonradar....As long as you *know* the nonradar map, you don't have to study the radar map. There was literally two navaids on the map, that I needed for something and I learned them on the go during a scenario. The most alarming thing that kept killing me was the radar phraseology. Those first two weeks, I'm still confident my instructors thought I was a dumbass lmao. I admittedly still require more practice, but I got a lot better by the time radar evals came. You will make some wild mistakes in radar and be baffled on why the hell you did that

The hardest struggle during training scenarios (nonradar and radar) for me was to realize it's okay to make mistakes and to stop getting so down on myself. The best reminder I got from my instructor before each run/eval was, "Go in there and do what you know how to do"
This is purely advice, but I do not recommend studying any map or phraseology before arriving in Oklahoma. You have ample time to study that once you get there. It is the easiest map you will ever have to memorize
 

32andBelow

Legendary Member
Messages
5,035
I've never studied this much in my life. I knew from reading this forum and Reddit, that someone like myself, will need to study everyday. Score as high as you can on your Academic tests (Double check everything and go slow on the checklist eval....Go slow 🤬). Those tests can literally be the final factor in wether or not you pass the program.

For nonradar, make sure you know you're phraseology/map before getting to the academy. They are not exaggerating, seriously *know it*. You're going to be surprised how much of a breeze the classroom time is going to be during the non radar portion because of this. Learning to write on physical flight strips after spending months writing on an iPad is gonna feel fucking weird, but you'll adapt quickly. In hindsight, I strongly encourage folks to know the aircraft characteristics chart before coming to the academy. I waited a week out before the test to study and I felt that was cutting it too close. Remember, we were given a huge headstart with zoom training (Know: nonradar map, nonradar phraseology, aircraft characteristics chart)

For radar, our instructors kept hinting at the craziness ahead us, joking/laughing about it while we were in nonradar....As long as you *know* the nonradar map, you don't have to study the radar map. There was literally two navaids on the map, that I needed for something and I learned them on the go during a scenario. The most alarming thing that kept killing me was the radar phraseology. Those first two weeks, I'm still confident my instructors thought I was a dumbass lmao. I admittedly still require more practice, but I got a lot better by the time radar evals came. You will make some wild mistakes in radar and be baffled on why the hell you did that

The hardest struggle during training scenarios (nonradar and radar) for me was to realize it's okay to make mistakes and to stop getting so down on myself. The best reminder I got from my instructor before each run/eval was, "Go in there and do what you know how to do"
Nah you don’t need any more practice. None of what you just learned will be used anymore 😂
 

slim

Active Member
Messages
111
This is purely advice, but I do not recommend studying any map or phraseology before arriving in Oklahoma. You have ample time to study that once you get there. It is the easiest map you will ever have to memorize
I second this. Don’t study before academy. Plenty of time there. You will just make yourself more anxious than necessary if you think you have to get all this studying done beforehand.
 

32andBelow

Legendary Member
Messages
5,035
Don’t do anything that person said.
To be fair when I read his it sounds like cus if the zoom it’s a little different. Like they are giving them all this stuff to look at earlier. Also they have thst time between basics and the academy where they aren’t doing anything.

but yah don’t study that hard
 
Messages
14
To be fair when I read his it sounds like cus if the zoom it’s a little different. Like they are giving them all this stuff to look at earlier. Also they have thst time between basics and the academy where they aren’t doing anything.

but yah don’t study that hard
But we were doing stuff in zoom. Went through LP1 to LP13 or something. Non-radar stuff up until separation. Course managers did not want us learning separation stuff before heading to the academy.
 

Solja

Member
Messages
72
This is purely advice, but I do not recommend studying any map or phraseology before arriving in Oklahoma. You have ample time to study that once you get there. It is the easiest map you will ever have to memorize
We were given the materials to study (huddle) in zoom training before going to the academy and were recommended by several instructors (thier supervisor as well) to get ahead. While in zoom, we were tested on what we had to study and did practice problems
 

AnyTrafficPleaseAdvise

Trusted Contributor
Messages
302
We were given the materials to study (huddle) in zoom training before going to the academy and were recommended by several instructors (thier supervisor as well) to get ahead. While in zoom, we were tested on what we had to study and did practice problems
Fair enough. We were given almost two weeks to study that map, and the majority of our class memorized it within a few days. All I’m saying is it’s definitely possible to do well without memorizing it prior to heading to Oklahoma.
 

FAABurger

Active Member
Messages
55
Fair enough. We were given almost two weeks to study that map, and the majority of our class memorized it within a few days. All I’m saying is it’s definitely possible to do well without memorizing it prior to heading to Oklahoma.
Wouldn’t it be a decent idea to at least study the map early, that way when you *should* be studying the map you can review everything else?
 
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