Appendices

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   Appendices
         1−1−14. DISTRIBUTION
         1−1−2. AUDIENCE
         1−1−7. DELIVERY DATES
         1−2−1. WORD MEANINGS
         1−2−2. COURSE DEFINITIONS
         1−2−3. NOTES
         1−2−4. REFERENCES
         1−2−5. ANNOTATIONS
         1−2−6. ABBREVIATIONS
      Section 1. General
         10-1-2. OBTAINING INFORMATION
         10-1-3. PROVIDING ASSISTANCE
         10-1-4. RESPONSIBILITY
         10-1-5. COORDINATION
         10-2-11. AIRCRAFT BOMB THREATS
         10-2-13. MANPADS ALERT
         10-2-18. VOLCANIC ASH
         10-2-2. FREQUENCY CHANGES
         10-2-3. AIRCRAFT ORIENTATION
         10-2-5. EMERGENCY SITUATIONS
         10-2-6. HIJACKED AIRCRAFT
         10-3-4. ALNOT
         10-3-7. ALNOT CANCELLATION
         10-4-1. TRAFFIC RESTRICTIONS
         10-4-2. LIGHTING REQUIREMENTS
         10-4-3. TRAFFIC RESUMPTION
         10-4-4. COMMUNICATIONS FAILURE
         10-5-1. EXPLOSIVE CARGO
         10-6-1. APPLICATION
         10-6-2. PHASES OF EMERGENCY
         10-6-4. INFLIGHT CONTINGENCIES
         10-7-1. INFORMATION RELAY
         10-7-2. IFR AND SVFR MINIMA
         10-7-3. VFR MINIMA
         10-7-4. SMOKE COLUMN AVOIDANCE
         10-7-5. EXTENDED NOTIFICATION
      Section 1. General
         11-1-1. DUTY RESPONSIBILITY
         12-1-1. APPLICATION
         12-1-3. ONE THOUSAND-ON-TOP
         12-1-4. SEPARATION
         12-1-6. PARACHUTE JUMPING
         12-1-7. SPECIAL VFR (SVFR)
         13-1-1. DESCRIPTION
         13-1-11. DELAY REPORTING
         13-1-12. OVERDUE AIRCRAFT
         13-1-14. FORECAST WINDS
         13-1-3. TRIAL PLANNING
         13-1-7. HOLDING
         13-2-1. DESCRIPTION
         13-2-3. INFORMATION MANAGEMENT
         13-2-5. COORDINATION
      Section 1. General
         2-1-1. ATC SERVICE
         2-1-10. NAVAID MALFUNCTIONS
         2-1-11. USE OF MARSA
         2-1-12. MILITARY PROCEDURES
         2-1-13. FORMATION FLIGHTS
         2-1-15. CONTROL TRANSFER
         2-1-16. SURFACE AREAS
         2-1-17. RADIO COMMUNICATIONS
         2-1-18. OPERATIONAL REQUESTS
         2-1-19. WAKE TURBULENCE
         2-1-2. DUTY PRIORITY
         2-1-21. TRAFFIC ADVISORIES
         2-1-25. WHEELS DOWN CHECK
         2-1-29. RVSM OPERATIONS
         2-1-3. PROCEDURAL PREFERENCE
         2-1-4. OPERATIONAL PRIORITY
         2-1-5. EXPEDITIOUS COMPLIANCE
         2-1-6. SAFETY ALERT
         2-1-8. MINIMUM FUEL
         2-2-1. RECORDING INFORMATION
         2-2-2. FORWARDING INFORMATION
         2-2-3. FORWARDING VFR DATA
         2-2-8. ALTRV INFORMATION
         2-3-1. GENERAL
         2-3-10. CONTROL SYMBOLOGY
         2-3-2. EN ROUTE DATA ENTRIES
         2-3-3. OCEANIC DATA ENTRIES
         2-3-4. TERMINAL DATA ENTRIES
         2-3-5. AIRCRAFT IDENTITY
         2-3-6. AIRCRAFT TYPE
         2-3-9. CLEARANCE STATUS
         2-4-1. RADIO COMMUNICATIONS
         2-4-11. PRIORITY INTERRUPTION
         2-4-14. WORDS AND PHRASES
         2-4-15. EMPHASIS FOR CLARITY
         2-4-16. ICAO PHONETICS
         2-4-17. NUMBERS USAGE
         2-4-18. NUMBER CLARIFICATION
         2-4-2. MONITORING
         2-4-22. AIRSPACE CLASSES
         2-4-7. AUTHORIZED RELAYS
         2-4-8. RADIO MESSAGE FORMAT
         2-5-2. NAVAID TERMS
         2-5-3. NAVAID FIXES
         2-6-1. FAMILIARIZATION
         2-7-1. CURRENT SETTINGS
         2-8-1. FURNISH RVR/RVV VALUES
         2-8-3. TERMINOLOGY
         2-9-1. APPLICATION
         2-9-2. OPERATING PROCEDURES
         2-9-3. CONTENT
      Section 1. General
         3-1-1. PROVIDE SERVICE
         3-1-10. OBSERVED ABNORMALITIES
         3-1-2. PREVENTIVE CONTROL
         3-1-3. USE OF ACTIVE RUNWAYS
         3-1-6. TRAFFIC INFORMATION
         3-1-7. POSITION DETERMINATION
         3-10-1. LANDING INFORMATION
         3-10-11. CLOSED TRAFFIC
         3-10-12. OVERHEAD MANEUVER
         3-10-3. SAME RUNWAY SEPARATION
         3-10-5. LANDING CLEARANCE
         3-10-9. RUNWAY EXITING
         3-12-1. APPLICATION
         3-12-2. DEPARTURE SEPARATION
         3-12-3. ARRIVAL SEPARATION
         3-2-1. LIGHT SIGNALS
         3-2-2. WARNING SIGNAL
         3-3-1. LANDING AREA CONDITION
         3-3-3. TIMELY INFORMATION
         3-3-4. BRAKING ACTION
         3-4-1. EMERGENCY LIGHTING
         3-4-10. RUNWAY EDGE LIGHTS
         3-4-16. TAXIWAY LIGHTS
         3-4-17. OBSTRUCTION LIGHTS
         3-4-18. ROTATING BEACON
         3-4-5. APPROACH LIGHTS
         3-4-6. ALS INTENSITY SETTINGS
         3-4-8. MALSR/ODALS
         3-4-9. ALSF-2/SSALR
         3-5-1. SELECTION
         3-5-2. STOL RUNWAYS
         3-5-3. TAILWIND COMPONENTS
         3-6-1. EQUIPMENT USAGE
         3-6-2. IDENTIFICATION
         3-6-3. INFORMATION USAGE
         3-6-5. RADAR-ONLY MODE
         3-7-1. GROUND TRAFFIC MOVEMENT
         3-7-3. GROUND OPERATIONS
         3-7-4. RUNWAY PROXIMITY
         3-9-1. DEPARTURE INFORMATION
         3-9-10. TAKEOFF CLEARANCE
         3-9-4. LINE UP AND WAIT (LUAW)
         3-9-5. ANTICIPATING SEPARATION
         3-9-6. SAME RUNWAY SEPARATION
         4-1-2. EXCEPTIONS
         4-1-3. CROSSING ALTITUDE
         4-1-4. VFR-ON-TOP
         4-1-5. FIX USE
      Section 2. Clearances
         4-2-1. CLEARANCE ITEMS
         4-2-2. CLEARANCE PREFIX
         4-2-3. DELIVERY INSTRUCTIONS
         4-2-4. CLEARANCE RELAY
         4-2-6. THROUGH CLEARANCES
         4-2-7. ALTRV CLEARANCE
         4-2-9. CLEARANCE ITEMS
         4-3-1. DEPARTURE TERMINOLOGY
         4-3-2. DEPARTURE CLEARANCES
         4-3-5. GROUND STOP
         4-3-6. DELAY SEQUENCING
         4-4-1. ROUTE USE
         4-4-4. ALTERNATIVE ROUTES
         4-4-5. CLASS G AIRSPACE
         4-4-6. DIRECT CLEARANCES
         4-5-2. FLIGHT DIRECTION
         4-5-3. EXCEPTIONS
         4-5-7. ALTITUDE INFORMATION
         4-6-2. CLEARANCE BEYOND FIX
         4-6-3. DELAYS
         4-6-4. HOLDING INSTRUCTIONS
         4-6-5. VISUAL HOLDING POINTS
         4-6-7. UNMONITORED NAVAIDs
         4-7-1. CLEARANCE INFORMATION
         4-7-10. APPROACH INFORMATION
         4-7-12. AIRPORT CONDITIONS
         4-7-13. SWITCHING ILS RUNWAYS
         4-7-6. ARRIVAL INFORMATION
         4-7-7. WEATHER INFORMATION
         4-8-1. APPROACH CLEARANCE
         4-8-10. APPROACH INFORMATION
         4-8-11. PRACTICE APPROACHES
         4-8-2. CLEARANCE LIMIT
         4-8-5. SPECIFYING ALTITUDE
         4-8-6. CIRCLING APPROACH
         4-8-7. SIDE-STEP MANEUVER
         4-8-8. COMMUNICATIONS RELEASE
         4-8-9. MISSED APPROACH
      Section 1. General
         5-1-10. DEVIATION ADVISORIES
         5-1-11. RADAR FIX POSTING
         5-1-12. POSITION REPORTING
         5-1-4. BEACON RANGE ACCURACY
         5-1-6. SERVICE LIMITATIONS
         5-1-7. ELECTRONIC CURSOR
         5-10-1. APPLICATION
         5-10-11. MISSED APPROACH
         5-10-13. TOWER CLEARANCE
         5-10-2. APPROACH INFORMATION
         5-10-3. NO-GYRO APPROACH
         5-10-4. LOST COMMUNICATIONS
         5-10-5. RADAR CONTACT LOST
         5-10-6. LANDING CHECK
         5-10-7. POSITION INFORMATION
         5-10-9. COMMUNICATIONS CHECK
         5-11-1. ALTITUDE INFORMATION
         5-11-3. DESCENT NOTIFICATION
         5-11-4. DESCENT INSTRUCTIONS
         5-12-10. ELEVATION FAILURE
         5-12-11. SURVEILLANCE UNUSABLE
         5-12-3. DESCENT INSTRUCTION
         5-12-6. DECISION HEIGHT
         5-12-7. POSITION ADVISORIES
         5-12-9. COMMUNICATION TRANSFER
         5-13-2. MONITOR AVAILABILITY
         5-13-3. MONITOR INFORMATION
         5-14-6. SECTOR ELIGIBILITY
         5-14-7. COAST TRACKS
         5-15-1. APPLICATION
         5-15-2. RESPONSIBILITY
         5-15-3. FUNCTIONAL USE
         5-15-4. SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS
         5-15-5. INFORMATION DISPLAYED
         5-15-6. CA/MCI
         5-15-8. TRACK SUSPEND FUNCTION
         5-2-1. ASSIGNMENT CRITERIA
         5-2-10. VFR CODE ASSIGNMENTS
         5-2-14. CODE MONITOR
         5-2-2. DISCRETE ENVIRONMENT
         5-2-23. BEACON TERMINATION
         5-2-24. ALTITUDE FILTERS
         5-2-26. ADS-B ALERTS
         5-2-3. NONDISCRETE ENVIRONMENT
         5-2-4. MIXED ENVIRONMENT
         5-2-8. RADIO FAILURE
         5-3-1. APPLICATION
         5-3-6. POSITION INFORMATION
         5-3-7. IDENTIFICATION STATUS
         5-3-8. TARGET MARKERS
         5-3-9. TARGET MARKERS
         5-4-1. APPLICATION
         5-4-2. TERMS
         5-4-3. METHODS
         5-4-4. TRAFFIC
         5-4-7. POINT OUT
         5-5-1. APPLICATION
         5-5-10. ADJACENT AIRSPACE
         5-5-11. EDGE OF SCOPE
         5-5-2. TARGET SEPARATION
         5-5-3. TARGET RESOLUTION
         5-5-4. MINIMA
         5-5-5. VERTICAL APPLICATION
         5-5-6. EXCEPTIONS
         5-5-7. PASSING OR DIVERGING
      Section 6. Vectoring
         5-6-1. APPLICATION
         5-6-2. METHODS
         5-7-1. APPLICATION
         5-7-2. METHODS
         5-7-3. SPEED ASSIGNMENTS
         5-7-4. TERMINATION
         5-8-1. PROCEDURES
         5-8-2. INITIAL HEADING
         5-8-4. DEPARTURE AND ARRIVAL
         5-9-11. TRANSITIONAL PROCEDURE
         5-9-4. ARRIVAL INSTRUCTIONS
      Section 1. General
         6-1-1. DISTANCE
         6-1-5. ARRIVAL MINIMA
         6-2-2. MINIMA ON SAME COURSE
         6-3-1. SEPARATION MINIMA
         6-4-1. APPLICATION
         6-4-4. SEPARATION BY PILOTS
         6-5-1. SEPARATION METHODS
         6-5-1. SEPARATION METHODS
         6-5-3. DME ARC MINIMA
         6-6-1. APPLICATION
         6-6-2. EXCEPTIONS
         6-6-3. SEPARATION BY PILOTS
         6-7-1. APPLICATION
         6-7-2. APPROACH SEQUENCE
         6-7-3. SEQUENCE INTERRUPTION
         6-7-5. INTERVAL MINIMA
         6-7-6. TIME CHECK
         6-7-7. MISSED APPROACHES
      Section 1. General
         7-1-2. VFR CONDITIONS
         7-2-1. VISUAL SEPARATION
      Section 3. VFR-On-Top
         7-3-1. VFR-ON-TOP
      Section 4. Approaches
         7-4-1. VISUAL APPROACH
         7-4-6. CONTACT APPROACH
         7-5-1. AUTHORIZATION
         7-5-2. PRIORITY
         7-5-3. SEPARATION
         7-5-4. ALTITUDE ASSIGNMENT
         7-5-5. LOCAL OPERATIONS
         7-5-6. CLIMB TO VFR
         7-6-1. APPLICATION
         7-6-11. TERMINATION OF SERVICE
         7-6-2. SERVICE AVAILABILITY
         7-6-3. INITIAL CONTACT
         7-6-4. IDENTIFICATION
         7-6-5. HOLDING
         7-6-6. APPROACH SEQUENCE
         7-6-7. SEQUENCING
         7-6-8. CONTROL TRANSFER
         7-6-9. ABANDONED APPROACH
         7-7-1. APPLICATION
         7-7-2. ISSUANCE OF EFC
         7-7-3. SEPARATION
         7-7-4. HELICOPTER TRAFFIC
         7-7-5. ALTITUDE ASSIGNMENTS
         7-7-6. APPROACH INTERVAL
         7-8-1. APPLICATION
         7-8-2. CLASS C SERVICES
         7-8-3. SEPARATION
         7-8-5. ALTITUDE ASSIGNMENTS
         7-8-6. EXCEPTIONS
         7-8-8. TERMINATION OF SERVICE
         7-9-1. APPLICATION
         7-9-3. METHODS
         7-9-4. SEPARATION
         7-9-5. TRAFFIC ADVISORIES
         7-9-6. HELICOPTER TRAFFIC
         7-9-7. ALTITUDE ASSIGNMENTS
         7-9-8. APPROACH INTERVAL
      Section 1. General
         8-1-1. ATC SERVICE
         8-1-3. VFR FLIGHT PLANS
         8-1-4. TYPES OF SEPARATION
         8-1-5. ALTIMETER SETTING
         8-1-9. RVSM OPERATIONS
         8-10-1. APPLICATION
         8-10-2. VERTICAL SEPARATION
         8-10-4. LATERAL SEPARATION
         8-2-1. GENERAL
         8-3-1. APPLICATION
         8-3-2. SEPARATION METHODS
         8-3-3. MACH NUMBER TECHNIQUE
         8-4-1. APPLICATION
         8-4-2. SEPARATION METHODS
         8-4-4. TRACK SEPARATION
         8-5-2. COURSE DIVERGENCE
         8-5-3. OPPOSITE DIRECTION
         8-5-4. SAME DIRECTION
         8-7-1. APPLICATION
         8-7-2. VERTICAL SEPARATION
         8-7-3. LONGITUDINAL SEPARATION
         8-7-4. LATERAL SEPARATION
         8-8-1. APPLICATION
         8-8-2. VERTICAL SEPARATION
         8-8-3. LONGITUDINAL SEPARATION
         8-8-4. LATERAL SEPARATION
         8-8-5. VFR CLIMB AND DESCENT
         8-9-1. APPLICATION
         8-9-2. VERTICAL SEPARATION
         8-9-3. LONGITUDINAL SEPARATION
         8-9-4. LATERAL SEPARATION
      9-8-1. GENERAL
      Section 1. General
         9-1-1. GENERAL
         9-1-2. SPECIAL HANDLING
         9-1-3. FLIGHT CHECK AIRCRAFT
         9-2-18. SAMP
         9-2-6. FLYNET
         9-2-8. INTERCEPTOR OPERATIONS
         9-2-9. SPECIAL INTEREST SITES
         9-3-1. APPLICATION
         9-3-2. SEPARATION MINIMA
         9-3-3. VFR-ON-TOP
         9-4-2. ROUTING
         9-4-3. ALTITUDE ASSIGNMENT
         9-4-4. SEPARATION MINIMA
         9-6-1. APPLICATION
         9-6-2. DERELICT BALLOONS
         9-7-1. COORDINATION
         9-7-3. CLASS D AIRSPACE
         9-7-4. OTHER CONTROL AIRSPACE
  • Appendicies Appendix A. Standard Operating Practice (SOP) for the Transfer of Position Responsibility

    Appendix A. Standard Operating Practice (SOP) for the Transfer of Position Responsibility

    1. PURPOSE

    This appendix prescribes the method and step-by-step process for conducting a position relief briefing and transferring position responsibility from one specialist to another.

    2. DISCUSSION

    1. In all operational facilities, the increase in traffic density and the need for the expeditious movement of traffic without compromising safety have emphasized the importance of the position relief process.
    2. The contents, methods, and practices used for position relief and briefings vary among personnel, and pertinent information is often forgotten or incompletely covered. Major problems occur whenever there is a heavy reliance upon memory, unsupported by routines or systematic reminders. This SOP addresses the complete task of transferring position responsibility and the associated relief briefing.
    3. Position relief unavoidably provides workload for specialists at the time of relief. The intent of this SOP is to make the transfer of position responsibility take place smoothly and to ensure a complete transfer of information with a minimum amount of workload. The method takes advantage of a self-briefing concept in which the relieving specialist obtains needed status information by reading from the Status Information Area/s to begin the relief process. Up to the moment information related to the control of aircraft or vehicular movements requires verbal exchanges between specialists during the relief process. The method also specifies the moment when the transfer of position responsibility occurs.
    4. In the final part of the relief process, the specialist being relieved monitors and reviews the position to ensure that nothing has been overlooked or incorrectly displayed and that the transfer of position responsibility occurred with a complete briefing.

    3. TERMS

    The following terms are important for a complete understanding of this SOP:

    1. Status Information Area (SIA). Manual or automatic displays of the current status of position related equipment and operational conditions or procedures.
    2. Written Notes. Manually recorded items of information kept at designated locations on the position of operation. They may be an element of the Status Information Area/s.
    3. Checklist. An ordered listing of items to be covered during a position relief.

    4. PRECAUTIONS

    1. Specialists involved in the position relief process should not rush or be influenced to rush.
    2. During position operation, each item of status information which is or may be an operational factor for the relieving specialist should be recorded as soon as it is operationally feasible so that it will not be forgotten or incorrectly recorded.
    3. Extra care should be taken when more than one specialist relieves or is being relieved from a position at the same time; e.g., combining or decombining positions. Such simultaneous reliefs should be approached with caution.

    5. RESPONSIBILITIES

    1. The specialist being relieved must be responsible for ensuring that any pertinent status information of which he/she is aware is relayed to the relieving specialist and is either:
      1. Accurately displayed in the Status Information Area/s for which he/she has responsibility, or
      2. Relayed to the position having responsibility for accurately displaying the status information.
    2. The relieving specialist must be responsible for ensuring that, prior to accepting responsibility for the position, any unresolved questions pertaining to the operation of the position are resolved.
    3. The relieving specialist and the specialist being relieved must share equal responsibility for the completeness and accuracy of the position relief briefing.
    4. The specialists engaged in a position relief must conduct the relief process at the position being relieved unless other procedures have been established and authorized by the facility air traffic manager.

    NOTE The “sharing” of this responsibility means that the specialist being relieved is obligated to provide a complete, accurate briefing and the relieving specialist is obligated to ensure that a briefing takes place and is to his/her total satisfaction.

    6. STEP-BY-STEP PROCESS

    1. PREVIEW THE POSITION
      Relieving Specialist Specialist Being Relieved
      1. Follow checklist and review the Status Information Area(s).
       
      NOTE This sub-step may be replaced by an authorized pre-position briefing provided an equivalent review of checklist items is accomplished.
      1. Observe position equipment, operational situation, and the work environment.
      2. Listen to voice communications and observe other operational actions.
      3. Observe current and pending aircraft and vehicular traffic and correlate with flight and other movement information.
      4. Indicate to the specialist being relieved that the position has been previewed and that the verbal briefing may begin.
       
      NOTE Substeps 6a2, 3, and 4 may be conducted concurrently or in any order.
    2. VERBAL BRIEFING
      Relieving Specialist Specialist Being Relieved
      1.  
      2.  
      3.  
      4.  
      5. Ask questions necessary to ensure a complete understanding of the operational situation.
      6.  
      1. Brief the relieving specialist on the abnormal status of items not listed on the Status Information Area(s) as well as on any items of special interest calling for verbal explanation or additional discussion.
      2. Brief on reported weather and other weather related information.
      3. Brief on traffic if applicable.
      4. Brief communication status of all known aircraft except for ERAM facilities using Voice Communication Indicator (VCI).
      5.  
      6. Completely answer any questions asked.
    3. ASSUMPTION OF POSITION RESPONSIBILITY
      Relieving Specialist Specialist Being Relieved
      1. Make a statement or otherwise indicate to the specialist being relieved that position responsibility has been assumed.
      2.  
      1.  
      2. Release the position to the relieving specialist and mentally note the time.
    4. REVIEW THE POSITION
      Relieving Specialist Specialist Being Relieved
      1. Check, verify, and update the information obtained in steps 6a and b.
      2. Check position equipment in accordance with existing directives.
      3.  
      4.  
      5.  
      6.  
      7.  
      8.  
      1.  
      2.  
      3. Review checklist, Status Information Area/s, written notes, and other prescribed sources of information and advise the relieving specialist of known omissions, updates, or inaccuracies.
      4. Observe overall position operation to determine if assistance is needed.
      5. If assistance is needed, provide or summon it as appropriate.
      6. Advise the appropriate position regarding known Status Information Area(s) omissions, updates, or inaccuracies.
      7. Sign-on the relieving specialist with the time as noted in step 6c2.
      8. Sign off the position in accordance with existing directives or otherwise indicate that the relief process is complete.
    Appendix B. Standard Operating Practice (SOP) for Aircraft Deviating for Weather Near Active Special Activity Airspace (SAA)

    Appendix B. Standard Operating Practice (SOP) for Aircraft Deviating for Weather Near Active Special Activity Airspace (SAA)

    The procedures listed below must be applied and contained in a facility SOP when aircraft deviate into and/or near an active or scheduled SAA:

    1. PURPOSE

    This appendix prescribes the method and step-by- step process for handling aircraft deviations for weather near active Special Activity Airspace (SAA). The procedures are intended to work in parallel to the preventive procedures outlined in FAA Order JO 7210.3, Facility Operation and Administration, Para 18-2-4a.9, which must be applied when weather is scheduled to impact an active or scheduled SAA.

    2. DISCUSSION

    1. In all operational facilities, the increase in traffic density and the need for the expeditious movement of traffic without compromising safety have emphasized the importance of handling aircraft deviations for weather in the vicinity of active SAA.
    2. The methods, and practices used for handling aircraft requesting or initiating deviations off of their filed route due to weather require time critical responses to the request or in response to observed course deviations. Major issues can occur whenever there is a heavy reliance upon reactive control actions when not performed according to this handbook and the procedures outlined in FAA Order JO 7210.3.
    3. Course deviations in areas near active SAA’s increase the workload for specialists at the time of their request or observation. The intent of this SOP is to make the handling of the requested deviation or to correct the observed course deviation take place smoothly and to ensure a safe operation with a minimum amount of workload.

    3. TERMS

    The following terms are important for a complete understanding of this SOP:

    1. Status Information Area (SIA). Manual or automatic displays of the current status of position related equipment and operational conditions or procedures.
    2. Special Activity Airspace (SAA). Airspace of defined dimensions as an Alert Area, Controlled Firing Area, Military Operations Area (MOA), Prohibited Area, Restricted Area or Warning Area.
    3. Deviations. A departure from a current clearance, such as an off course maneuvers to avoid weather or turbulence.
    4. Using Agency. The using agency is the military unit or other organization whose activity established the requirement for the SAA. The using agency is responsible for ensuring that:
      1. The airspace is used only for its designated purpose.
      2. Proper scheduling procedures are established and utilized.
      3. The controlling agency is kept informed of changes in scheduled activity, to include the completion of activities for the day.
      4. A point of contact is made available to enable the controlling agency to verify schedules, and coordinate access for emergencies, weather diversions, etc.
      5. An ATC facility may be designated as the using agency for joint-use areas when that facility has been granted priority for use of the airspace in a joint-use letter of procedure or letter of agreement.

    4. PRECAUTIONS

    1. Unless clearance of nonparticipating aircraft in/through/adjacent to an active SAA is provided for in a Letter of Agreement or Letter of Procedure, any clearance issued to a nonparticipating aircraft must ensure separation from that SAA by the appropriate minima specified in paragraph 9-3-2.
    2. The specialist receiving a request for a route deviation in the vicinity of an active SAA cannot issue a clearance into the active SAA airspace, unless the provisions of Paragraph 9-3-4 of this handbook are applied. The FAA has no jurisdictional authority over the use of non-joint use prohibited/restricted/warning area airspace; therefore, clearance cannot be issued for flight therein without appropriate approval.
    3. If the specialist is able to coordinate approval for entry into the SAA from the using agency, a clearance to the aircraft complying with the provisions coordinated with the using agency can be issued; the specialist must notify the OS/CIC of this situation and of subsequent requests or deviations from other aircraft in the same area.
    4. Use of Code 7700 for aircraft deviations into active SAA is not encouraged, particularly in situations involving multiple aircraft. Positive identification of aircraft may be lost if an aircraft deviates from flight plan track, particularly in the event of a momentary loss of radar or other interruption in tracking.

    5. RESPONSIBILITIES

    If a deviation occurs that causes an aircraft to enter SAA the air traffic team must follow the procedures outlined below:

    1. Attempt the following:
      1. Handoff the aircraft to the Using Agency and transfer communications; or
      2. Point Out the aircraft to the Using Agency. The controller must:
        1. (a) Continue to provide safety alerts and traffic advisories, as appropriate, to the affected aircraft.
        2. (b) Continue to coordinate with the Using Agency until the situation is resolved.
        3. (c) Assist the aircraft in exiting the SAA.
      3. If the handoff or point out is unsuccessful, the controller must:
        1. (a) If able, advise the Using Agency of the pilot’s actions.
        2. (b) Provide safety alerts and traffic advisories, as appropriate.
        3. (c) Assist the aircraft in exiting the SAA as quickly as the weather allows.
        4. (d) Continue to coordinate with the Using Agency until the situation is resolved.
      4. If no approval to enter the SAA is given by the using agency
        1. (a) The specialist must advise the aircraft requesting the course deviation, or deviating toward the SAA, the status of the SAA, and that no clearance can be issued permitting entry into the airspace or;
        2. (b) If an alternative course, which remains clear of the active SAA, is available, offer it to the pilot of the aircraft in question.
      5. If the pilot of the nonparticipating aircraft exercises their discretion to deviate from that clearance which ensures separation from an active SAA, and the track of the aircraft will not maintain the required minima from an active SAA, controllers must ascertain if the pilot is exercising emergency authority:
        1. (a) If so, provide assistance and obtain information as provided in Chapter 10, Emergencies.
        2. (b) If not, provide appropriate pilot deviation notification as specified in Paragraph 2-1-26, Pilot Deviation Notification.
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